Wind of February

by Chitola Utsanami

The wind entered through the sills and our nostrils
Plundering our hearth.

You could see it earlier that morning
Raising an army of snow into drifts and then walls.

The fox and the deer felt this army before.
One went into a deep musky den, the other made a shallow bed under a
shield of fir, fur and fear.

No creature was safe.  No one was immune to its progress.
Even a low bearing vole would not dare bore holes in such a snow. Continue Reading →

Palimpsest

photo by Heather Zeng, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Psychology
Park University
www.park.edu

Deep Ecology: Steps to a new worldwiew

L’Ecologia Profonda – eBook

Lineamenti per una nuova visione del mondo
Author: Guido Dalla Casa

Price: € 5,90

Summary in English:  Deep Ecology. Steps to a new worldwiew. Pangea, 1996 – Arianna, 2008 (Ebook)

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Educating, Counseling and Healing With Nature

Natural Attraction Ecology and The Web of Life Model:  Planet Earth Speaks Through 53 Natural Senses For Personal, Social and Environmental Well-Being, by Michael J Cohen

In his new sensory environmental science book, Educating, Counseling and Healing With Nature, Michael J. Cohen, Ph.D, demonstrates through a web-of-life ecology model that we inherit at least 53 natural senses and that they guide us to live in peaceful balance with Planet Earth’s global ecosystem and each other. The book documents from our human experience that, to our loss, Industrial Society’s seldom-acknowledged prejudice against nature-and-the-natural  socializes us to injure and suppress most of these natural senses. This disturbance underlies many disorders we suffer.

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Recovering the Eco-Unconscious

by Robin Gates

Western culture has a history of union and subsequent separation from nature. This split between spirit and nature, psyche and soma, intellect and emotion, science, philosophy, and religion, manifests in our individual and collective consciousness creating crises that span the spectrum of human experience, from the psychological to the environmental. Since we have within our unconscious memories of our being in union with nature, it is a matter of recovering them through what Carl Jung called the individuation process; whereby, a person develops one’s unique individuality from that which has been imposed on him or her from the environment. An expansion of consciousness and recovery of the eco-unconscious is achieved by the confrontation with and integration of unconscious material culminating in coniunctio, or union of the opposites. To read the whole essay, download the pdf.

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Robin M. Gates  is a student in the Psychology Department at Pacifica Graduate Institute, CA, where he is pursuing a Ph.D. in Depth Psychology. He holds an M.A. in Psychology and a B.A. in Philosophy and has been teaching at the college level for over 10 years.  This article came as a response to a personal healing journey from an illness which lasted over seven years.

Wild Swimming Revisited

by Harriet Greenwood

Wild Swimming has certainly caught on in the UK at least since I reviewed Roger Deakin’s Waterlog eight years ago

Two new books out this year chronicle the best places to swim, paddle or plunge outdoors in Britain.
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Wild Swimming

Immersing yourself in the wildness, magic and history of Britain
by Daniel Start

When I was young, the rambling old house we shared with two other families came with lakes, woods, streams and an overgrown boat house. Situated deep in the heart of the Wye valley, close to the Welsh border, in the UK,  it was here my brother and I first learned to make dams, build rafts and explore the river.

I loved one stream in particular. Gushing and snaking its way down the side of the Black Mountains, its mossy dingles and foxglove-filled dells enchanted me. Plunging into deep pools and sliding down chutes, my brother and I spent much of our summer squealing and slithering along its helter-skelter of cascades.

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“Brother Sun Sister Moon”

by John Scull

A while back we were contributing favorite films related to ecopsychology. I forgot to mention my favorite, “Brother Sun Sister Moon,” featuring Donovan’s musical settings of some of St. Francis’ prayers and a very lovely St. Clare.  Francis is portrayed as a gentle nature-loving hippie and nicely ignores the side of him that was a Christian fanatic and skilled organizer.

For an amazing new cinema resource, the National Film Board of Canada, famous for their shorts and documentaries, has now compiled all their ecology-related footage and made it available online for free.  Some full length films, some excerpts.  Browse